Self Made: NASE's Blog

Six Tax Tips From The IRS

Friday, April 12, 2013
If you’re waiting till the final hour (or weekend) to prepare your tax return, make sure you have read through the Internal Revenue Service’s Top Six Tax Tips for the Self-Employed.  For a highlight of the article, read on below, and for more details and links to important Self-Employed forms that you will likely need, be sure to click on the link above and visit the IRS website.

1. Self-employment income can include pay that you receive for part-time work you do out of your home. This could include income you earn in addition to your regular job.

2. Self-employed individuals file a Schedule C, Profit or Loss from Business, or Schedule C-EZ, Net Profit from Business, with their Form 1040.

3. If you are self-employed, you generally have to pay self-employment tax as well as income tax. Self-employment tax includes Social Security and Medicare taxes. You figure this tax using Schedule SE, Self-Employment Tax.

4. If you are self-employed you may have to make estimated tax payments. People typically make estimated tax payments to pay taxes on income that is not subject to withholding. If you do not make estimated tax payments, you may have to pay a penalty when you file your income tax return. The underpayment of estimated tax penalty applies if you do not pay enough taxes during the year.

5. When you file your tax return, you can deduct some business expenses for the costs you paid to run your trade or business. You can deduct most business expenses in full, but some costs must be ’capitalized.’ This means you can deduct a portion of the expense each year over a period of years.

6. You may deduct only the costs that are both ordinary and necessary. An ordinary expense is one that is common and accepted in your industry. A necessary expense is one that is helpful and appropriate for your trade or business.


Don’t forget about helpful resources from the NASE and our National Tax Advisor, Keith Hall. Head over to the Business Learning Center to use our tax calculators, read some articles and watch some webinars.

Good luck with your taxes!

1 Comment

  1. 1 Danny 17 Oct
    Thank you for the post and highlight information. They are really helpful.

Comment

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Self Made

A blog on the self-employed and micro-business

Meet the NASE Staff Bloggers


Katie Vlietstra - As Vice President for Government Relations and Public Affairs, I work to explain how actions on Capitol Hill can impact the self-employed. I love D.C. and have made my home in Capitol Hill, where I live with my husband and black Labrador, Coltrane. We love playing volleyball and softball on the National Mall. 

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