NASE Real Estate Blog

When you have a Real Estate question, let our experts help.

Monday, November 17, 2014
That is a great question and has become even more important in our modern digital age. When speaking with our sellers we emphasize that buyers do not normally make a decision to BUY from home photos they see on the internet, but they do make the decision to LOOK based upon home photos they see. We also remind our sellers that “the way you LIST is not the way you LIVE”. In other words, a seller should focus on presenting the home is such a way that it will appeal to the highest number of buyers. With that in mind ...
Monday, November 17, 2014
Your question is a legal one and I encourage you to seek legal counsel before  signing a legally binding contract. However, I will attempt to answer your question on a broad basis. In a real estate sales contract liquidated damages usually represents a monetary settlement between the parties in the event either party does not perform all of the agreed upon terms of the contract, triggering a default. If a buyer defaults , the liquidated damages are most often deemed to be forfeiture to the seller of the earnest money in title escrow. If a seller defaults, the liquidated damages ...
Monday, November 17, 2014
The most common answer to that question is no. In a typical residential transaction, the listing broker charges the full commission (in your case 6% of the sales price) which is split (usually 50-50 but not always) between the listing broker and what is known as the “procuring” (the broker who found the buyer) broker. Each broker then further divides the commission with the agents involved in the transaction, assuming they are different than the managing broker. Keep in mind that real estate agents mostly work as independent contractors underneath a sponsoring broker. This is very common among larger real ...
Monday, November 17, 2014
Owning a home on acreage can be rewarding from a personal enjoyment perspective as well as for its potential to appreciate over the long term. In making the decision to purchase, always evaluate what is normal and typical for the area. Assuming your new home will be on a water well and a septic system, you should be fine as long as most other homes in the area on lots of similar size are served by a well and septic system. A critical factor in evaluating rural properties is a thorough understanding of the zoning regulations not only of your ...
Monday, November 17, 2014
Great question. I congratulate you on being proactive in choosing a real estate professional. Your efforts should pay  dividends. First, I suggest you perform an honest self-assessment of what characteristics are important to you. Are there certain neighborhoods you have an interest in? A specific price range? Are you looking for someone with youthful enthusiasm or perhaps a seasoned professional  with years of experience in the business? Do you prefer someone with creative flair or a number cruncher? When you have answered these questions, I recommend you reach out to contacts  you have met locally . Request referrals  of real ...
Monday, November 17, 2014
I actually get this question quite often. The obvious answer is to sell your home when the demand is highest …and the supply is lowest. The tricky part is determining when that might be. In residential real estate, demand often has a seasonal component and is based upon traditional weather patterns, school calendars, and popular holidays. In Texas for example, demand usually increases in early spring and lasts through mid-summer. The weather is milder , the year-end holidays are over, and those families with children want to be situated before a new school term begins in late August. Demand often ...
Monday, November 17, 2014
In most states, annual property taxes are a factor of local tax rates, the home’s current assessed value, as well as exemptions for which the homeowner might qualify. It is important to make sure you are taking advantage of any existing exemptions which might apply. For example, is the home occupied? In many cases, owner occupants get a break. Are you over 65? Disabled in some way? Check with your local taxing authority to ensure that you are receiving credit for any exemption available. The home’s assessed value is most often the predominant factor in determining property taxes due. The ...

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