SelfInformed Archive

Your monthly source for the latest news for your micro-business. From operations and marketing to legislative updates from Capitol Hill, SelfInformed has it all!

2014 Issues


SelfInformed - December 2014

Elena Hines, Owner of Golden Leaf Café located in Menomonie, Wisconsin has been a NASE member since 2013. Elena enjoys all the benefits of the NASE, but especially likes the newsletters and everything the NASE is doing to keep members informed about what is going on in the small business world and in Washington D.C.

SelfInformed - November 2014

For some entrepreneurs, establishing your niche business was one of the easiest decisions you have ever made. There was a subject, a topic or a hobby of great interest to you. In fact, you couldn’t get enough of the learning and growing process. You gravitated to the business because it was a natural fit for your skills and interests.

SelfInformed - October 2014

The minute you decide to sell your business, you face two choices. This short NASE guide will aid micro business owners (aka small business owners) and entrepreneurs properly prepare their business for sale. Let’s start with a brief on personal motivation and goal setting for your sale.

SelfInformed - September 2014

All small business owners and entrepreneurs have one thing in common: they had a great idea and the passion to pursue the challenge of starting a business. There are many hurdles to overcome when building a business to ensure its success. What keeps someone else from stealing your idea, and capitalizing on it? Are you aware of the new law, passed in 2011, that grants a patent to the first person that creates an invention, rather than the person with the idea? There are many misconceptions about protecting intellectual property, and this guide will help you move in the right direction toward protecting your intellectual assets.

SelfInformed - July 2014

If you’re self-employed with a family, at some point you’re going to ask yourself the question: is my small business going to become the family business? There are plenty of reasons to get your family involved in your small business. First, it helps your spouse and children understand exactly what is involved in starting a business and running it from the ground up. Second, it helps teach your children about the value of hard work and taking pride in a good job. Third, your spouse and your children are often your business’s most valuable assets!